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How to Host Your Own Virtual Listening Party


Do you miss hearing live music together with your friends?
We do, too!
 

Miller Theatre’s Live from Columbia video series offers the perfect opportunity to connect meaningfully with others through a shared live music experience. Follow these steps below to host your own Virtual Listening Party. 


DOWNLOAD THE FULL GUIDE

 

STEP 1 — MAKE A GUEST LIST

Choose a small gathering of friends that you would like to invite to experience and discuss this concert with afterwards. Gather their email addresses for the next step.

 

 

STEP 2 — SEND AN EMAIL INVITATION

Invite your guests to join you for a Virtual Listening Party! Make the invitation very clear on what they need to do to join. Don’t forget to include: Date & Time, Link to the Video Premiere, Link to your own Zoom meeting to join for post-concert conversation, and RSVP details if you’d like to know who is coming.

 

STEP 3 — SEND AN EMAIL REMINDER

Remind your guests the morning of your Virtual Listening Party by resending the invitation with all of the details.
 

 

STEP 4 — WATCH, ENJOY & DISCUSS

Tune in to the premiere of the performance, and then head over to host your Zoom chat with your guests. To help guide your discussion, we will post some suggested questions for each performance below.


 

Suggested Questions for Conversations

for February 16 - JACK Quartet

• The string quartet is one of the most iconic and versatile formations in chamber music. How does Grido align with your understanding of string quartets? In what ways is it similar or different to other string quartet works you’re familiar with?
 

• In these pieces, what are some of the many ways the musicians are called upon to produce sounds with their instruments? Are there any surprises? Do any of these sounds evoke comparison to non-musical references?
 

• Helmut Lachenmann just recently celebrated his 85th birthday. The works on this program span 35 years of his output, starting with Pression, written when he was in his early thirties. An opportunity with a concert like this is to inhabit the composer’s body of work and sound world more deeply than listening to a single work. What observations or insights do you have after hearing these pieces in this context?
 

• In music, much like viewing a piece of art or reading a book, you may have an initial reaction upon your first encounter that evolves after repeated listening. How did each of these pieces resonate with you just now, and what do you think you might hear differently if you listened again and became more familiar with the music?