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How to Host Your Own Virtual Listening Party


Do you miss hearing live music together with your friends?
We do, too!
 

Miller Theatre’s Live from Columbia video series offers the perfect opportunity to connect meaningfully with others through a shared live music experience. Follow these steps below to host your own Virtual Listening Party. 


DOWNLOAD THE FULL GUIDE

 

STEP 1 — MAKE A GUEST LIST

Choose a small gathering of friends that you would like to invite to experience and discuss this concert with afterwards. Gather their email addresses for the next step.

 

 

STEP 2 — SEND AN EMAIL INVITATION

Invite your guests to join you for a Virtual Listening Party! Make the invitation very clear on what they need to do to join. Don’t forget to include: Date & Time, Link to the Video Premiere, Link to your own Zoom meeting to join for post-concert conversation, and RSVP details if you’d like to know who is coming.

 

STEP 3 — SEND AN EMAIL REMINDER

Remind your guests the morning of your Virtual Listening Party by resending the invitation with all of the details.
 

 

STEP 4 — WATCH, ENJOY & DISCUSS

Tune in to the premiere of the performance, and then head over to host your Zoom chat with your guests. To help guide your discussion, we will post some suggested questions for each performance below.


 

Suggested Questions for Conversations

for January 19 - Brandee Younger, harp and
Dezron Douglas, double bass

• The compositions in this session come from a variety of sources – legendary harpist Alice Coltrane, soul icon Marvin Gaye, and the artists themselves – Dezron Douglas and Brandee Younger. In each performance, can you hear the elements that seem essential to the composition (which would be played the same way each time) as well as what seems to be added as improvisation?
 

• Brandee Younger's harp sometimes takes on the role of a chordal instrument, much like the piano or guitar would in a more traditional jazz combo. For this performance, in what ways is the harp's role similar to a piano or guitar, and in what ways is it different?
 

• In a duo format it usually falls to the bass player to hold down a constant rhythmic pattern that is the meter or "groove" for the composition. How much of Dezron Douglas's performance is devoted to this role?  Are there moments where he steps outside of the basic groove in interesting ways?