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Composer Portraits: Frederic Rzewski

But it’s refreshing to deal with this noble form again, especially now that a new generation of excellent string players has appeared who are ready to experiment, while carrying on with the classical tradition. It makes one want to live longer…

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Les Delices: Music for Fated Lovers

Just as in Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, true love sometimes ends with the ultimate sacrifice. The legendary lovers Hippolytus & Aricia, Hero & Leander, and Pyramus & Thisbe indulged forbidden desires, arranged secret trysts, faced natural disasters, suffered tragic death, and even – with intercession from the Gods – found redemption and reunification.

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Composer Portraits: Christopher Cerrone

I think I love the voice and percussion because they are the oldest and most primal ways of making music—and nearly everyone is equipped to make it… And perhaps more than any other kind of composition I do, the creation of a new work for either percussion, voice, or both necessitates intense collaboration.

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Composer Portraits: Ann Cleare

Born in 1983 in central Ireland, Ann Cleare studied at University College Cork, where she received her master’s degree in 2008. She then took the foundation course at IRCAM and began doctoral studies at Harvard with Chaya Czernowin and Hans Tutschku. Her music has been played widely in the U.S. and in Europe, by ensembles including the JACK Quartet, Argento Chamber Ensemble, and Elision.

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New York Polyphony: Tallis Lamentations

While Thomas Tallis’s name may not be uttered as quickly as Mozart, Beethoven, or Bach when naming the greatest composers in the Western classical canon — it should be. While his extant output is relatively small and mostly sacred in nature, we have vocal and instrumental works in a vast exploration of styles.

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Composer Portraits: Raphael Cendo

Raphaël Cendo is one of the principal exponents of what he calls “saturation,” driving at an excess in every dimension of musical performance: density, gesture, instrumental practice.

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Glass + Schubert

“By happy coincidence, this month ends with a double birthday: January 31 is the day on which Philip Glass and Franz Schubert were born. And while, chronologically speaking, 140 years separate the two composers, the affinities between them are striking.”

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Carnival of the Animals (2017)

Leonard Bernstein, in one of his Young People’s Concerts, explored the question, “What makes music funny?” He goes on to suggest, “The first and simplest way that music can be amusing is by simply imitating nature. It’s one of the oldest ways of making you laugh —by imitating things.”

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Tallis Scholars: Heinrich Isaac at 500

“The music is enlivened by syncopations and complex internal rhythms, as well as some judicious word-painting…”

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Bach Piano Concertos

“This camaraderie is an element of Bach’s music that I usually don’t focus on so much myself when performing as a soloist.”

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Composer Portraits: Chen Yi

“It melts into air and light, it’s like the space in Chinese paintings, it’s lled into the dancing lines in Chinese calligraphy, it’s the spirit in a human being’s mind.”

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Vox Luminis: Royal Funeral Music

“Morley conveys beautifully the sense of grief at the inevitability of death mingled with the hope of the resurrection — a true apposition of light and shadow.”

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